Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 

News:

If this site has helped you with your knowledge of Upholstery, consider making a donation. Make a Donation


If you have found this site helpful, please consider making even a small donation. All donations go towards keeping this site available to Professionals and consumers alike. Thank You.


Author Topic: Correct term for upholstery cardboard  (Read 6634 times)

Joanna

  • Guest
Correct term for upholstery cardboard
« on: December 04, 2006, 09:39:15 AM »
OK, this is going to sound elementary to all you experienced upholsterer's but I want to know what most people call the cardboard which is used on rolled arms of chairs and sofas to form the sides. I use it quite often for my cornices as stiffener instead of OSB and in describing it to others, I have called it cardboard, panelboard, and chipboard. My supplier (C&S Upholstery Supply) simply calls it thick and thin cardboard (2 different thicknesses). Doesn't sound very professional to me - don't want to tell clients their treatments are made out of cardboard!  :o

Thanks all!

Offline Buck

  • NonProMember
  • **
  • Posts: 2117
  • Gender: Male
  • stitching since 1959, I swear!
    • www.buckminsterupholstery.com
Re: Correct term for upholstery cardboard
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2006, 09:52:32 AM »
I most often call it panel board, but also know it as chipboard.
  Kim
Kim Buckminster
Falls City, Nebraska

www.buckminsterupholstery.com

"There is no end to my life. No beginning to my death. Death is life..."
 Moussorgsky - 1874 "Pictures at an exhibition"

Offline Stacey

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2966
  • Gender: Male
  • Pro Upholsterer 42 years
    • Barnard's Upholstery
Re: Correct term for upholstery cardboard
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2006, 12:34:11 PM »
Panel board is what I call it and most of my suppliers do as well.
Stacey Barnard
Barnard's Upholstery & Auto Trim
Time proved and valuable information to share.
http://www.barnardsupholsteryshop.com

Gene

  • Guest
Re: Correct term for upholstery cardboard
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2006, 08:53:07 PM »
Having sold industrial paper packaging products for many years, here's my two cents.

The upholstery industry generally calls the afore mentioned product 'panel board'.

Among the general public, the terms 'panel board', 'chipboard', and 'cardboard' have all become generic words for the same type of paper product. It's actually nothing more than unrefined, really thick paper.

Do you know that we make paper the exact same way the ancient Egyptians made paper, except we use trees instead of papirus, and we use equipment that is a bit bigger that can be plugged into an electrical outlet?

I call it "panel board" because most suppliers know what I'm talking about.

Joanna, why not call it whatever your supplier calls it when you order it from your supplier, and call it whatever you think sounds most expensive when you are talking to your customers?

Gene

Joanna

  • Guest
Re: Correct term for upholstery cardboard
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2006, 01:07:40 AM »
Thanks for the responses. I especially like Gene's suggestion of calling it what sounds the most expensive to clients. I don't think telling a client that their $750 cornice was created from CARDBOARD is a good idea!!!  :o But I love this stuff and can't believe how many different uses I come up with for it other than what it was intended.

I've attached a picture of a cornice (pelmet) that I made using PANELBOARD  ;). For my cornices, I prefer the look of historical treatments which were not thick like the more popular cornices of today using 3/8" or 1/2" plywood. Just a personal preference. And this thin cardboard does the trick. Thank goodness for the upholstery skills I have acquired over the years, even as limited as they are. They come in handy sometimes!

And no, Gene, I did not know that about how paper is made. Interesting!

Agnes

  • Guest
Re: Correct term for upholstery cardboard
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2006, 01:11:23 AM »
Wow, that's beautiful!!!

I've never used that "cardboard", only plywood for cornices. Do you glue the fabric? Obviously, you can't staple to it.

What other uses are you finding for this stuff? ... we need a good name for it...;)

Joanna

  • Guest
Re: Correct term for upholstery cardboard
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2006, 01:26:34 AM »
Thanks, Agnes!

Yes, I glue the fabric on. I use Rowley's fringe adhesive.

I use the cardboard in jabot returns sometimes if I'm having a problem with it flaring. Staple it to the side of the mount board and it makes a very rigid stationery return.

Right now I'm working on a corona to go above a headboard and it projects from the wall 12" in a curved arc. Couldn't figure out how to keep the fabric pushed forward to follow the shape of the arc and finally thought of the 'cardboard'. It is easily bent and shaped to the form of the corona and holds the fabric in place. I'm sure that description is as clear as mud but I'll post a pic when I have it completed. I've attached a picture of the corona in its primal stage so maybe it's a letter clearer as to what I'm saying.??

There are other things I've used it for but at this hour, my memory is already sleeping.

I agree............we need a better name for it!

Agnes

  • Guest
Re: Correct term for upholstery cardboard
« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2006, 01:29:53 AM »
I never thought of jabots! Yes, some fabrics are so uncooperative!!!

Love that corona! I understand your explanation, thanks. I would love to see a pic when finished!

PS: I love Rowley's glue too ;).

Gene

  • Guest
Re: Correct term for upholstery cardboard
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2006, 09:39:28 PM »
Beautiful pelmet, Joanna,

Do you do anything to ensure the panelboard does not warp?

Thanks,

Gene

PS: I added 'pelmet' to our glossary.

Agnes

  • Guest
Re: Correct term for upholstery cardboard
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2006, 10:00:51 PM »
Quote
PS: I added 'pelmet' to our glossary.
Thank you Gene :).

Joanna

  • Guest
Re: Correct term for upholstery cardboard
« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2006, 01:59:05 AM »
Wow! How cool! I didn't even know that we had a glossary...........but I see it now. What a great and helpful idea. Thanks for adding that term, Gene.

To answer your question about keeping the panelboard from warping, every time I use it, I have  two thicknesses glued together. It's amazing how rigid it becomes. I don't know if it's because of the two layers together or from the steaming I give it to make it lay flat or a combination of both. Even the thin cardboard is surprisingly firm and straight. Might not be a good idea to use in a high humidity area but so far, that hasn't been a problem.

I'm thinking about buying stock in the panelboard company because I use so much of it.  ;)

Offline Stephen

  • NonProMember
  • **
  • Posts: 1352
  • Gender: Male
  • An upholsterer since 1966
    • Winters Sewing
Re: Correct term for upholstery cardboard
« Reply #11 on: December 07, 2006, 02:11:10 AM »
I've attached a picture of a cornice (pelmet) that I made using PANELBOARD  ;). For my cornices, I prefer the look of historical treatments which were not thick like the more popular cornices of today using 3/8" or 1/2" plywood. 

Beautiful Work Joanna!! I've never used panelboard to make cornices. I mainly make cornices using 7/16" OSB Strand board (waferboard). Your pelmet looks quite professional and very precise in design. Your scallops and patterns are balanced and even. Your tassels are carefully aligned. You should be proud. Keep up the good work!

Best Wishes,
Stephen
« Last Edit: December 08, 2006, 04:49:16 PM by Stephen »

upholsteryboy

  • Guest
Re: Correct term for upholstery cardboard
« Reply #12 on: December 07, 2006, 11:48:33 PM »
thats really nice

Joanna

  • Guest
Re: Correct term for upholstery cardboard
« Reply #13 on: December 08, 2006, 04:32:26 PM »
Stephen,

That's a beautiful cornice that you made with the gathered scalloped edge. Goodness - looks like a lot of work!

Thanks for the compliments. But quite honestly, using this method with panelboard makes it quite simple. Probably looks more difficult that it is. If one doesn't like to glue and wait for drying time, this would not be a method for them. I use clothes pins a lot to hold things in place until they're dry. I just completed a sectioned cornice/pelmet covered in vinyl which I used some clothespins in a few places and about panicked when I took them off the vinyl. There were impressions left from the clothespins but fortunately the impressions disappeared within a few hours. Probably all you upholstery experts knew that it would heal itself but I didn't!  :o Whew!!

Offline Stacey

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2966
  • Gender: Male
  • Pro Upholsterer 42 years
    • Barnard's Upholstery
Re: Correct term for upholstery cardboard
« Reply #14 on: December 08, 2006, 04:39:54 PM »
Actually sometimes they don't heal themselves. If that should occur then a little bit of heat will take the indents out.
Stacey Barnard
Barnard's Upholstery & Auto Trim
Time proved and valuable information to share.
http://www.barnardsupholsteryshop.com